By Kevin O'Keefe

Twitter is Testing an Articles Feature

As reported by Engadget’s Mariella Moon, Twitter is testing a new feature called Twitter Articles.

Rather than the 280 character limit, a user could post a whole article.

Reverse engineering expert Jane Manchun Wong, says the feature is being developed and shared a screenshot of the Twitter Web interface that showed “no Twitter articles yet” and “create a Twitter Article”.

Those of you using Twitter are finding that Twitter as a source of sharing and receiving news and information is as hot as ever.

Following the right people and the right lists on Twitter, delivers, in effect, an AP on niche subjects. Plus you get to engage with the “reporter” or “readers,” so much so that intimate relationships of trust are established.

Add to this, Twitter’s existing feature that allows you to create a thread of tweets so that you can tell a story by using the 280 characters of an unlimited number of threaded tweets in a row.

Users can read your thread in a “reader view,” as opposed to a list of tweets, much like a brief blog post.

Could Twitter articles replace or make a dent in blog posts? Not really.

As a blogger, you need to have your home base. The place where all of your insight and commentary is stored – and archived.

Now, if there were an API automatically posting your blog posts at Twitter or vice versa, that may be different. The philosophy that drives social media companies and the fulfillment issues is likely to prevent that.

Kevin O'Keefe
About the Author

Trial lawyer turned legal tech entrepreneur, I am the founder and CEO of LexBlog, a legal blog community of over 30,000 blog publishers, worldwide. LexBlog’s publishing platform is used on a subscription basis by over 18,000 legal professionals, including the largest law firm in each India, China and the United States.

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