Most discussion by lawyers and bar associations regarding the fine points of how legal ethics rules apply to social media serves no one — neither lawyers nor the people we serve.

The latest comes from the New York County Lawyers Association (“NYCLA”) and the Association of the Bar of the City of New York (“City Bar”) spending countless hours pontificating issues such as how to determine whether LinkedIn is advertising or not and what is a reasonable period of time within which to require lawyers to check their LinkedIn profiles to see if someone left an endorsement which describes a lawyer as a specialist — God forbid.

Lawyers have been using LinkedIn for a long time without any problem. Lawyers with these bar associations looking for something to do now study whether and how lawyers ought to use LinkedIn? C’mon.

Catherine Foti adds to the silliness in reporting that thanks to a the action of these bar associations LinkedIn is now less risky for lawyers to use.

Lawyers ought to be looking for ways to act like the people they serve. Anyone regulating lawyers ought to be looking to support ways for lawyers to get out and connect with people, not look at ways to chill lawyers from engaging folks online.

Image courtesy for Flickr by Craig Sunter