MySpace lawyer marketing is working writes Dick Dahl, a reporter for USA Lawyers.
New York City Entertainment lawyer Jason Lopez, age 31, uses MySpace to market his entertainment law practice, an area of practice seeing the best marketing results on MySpace. He looks for promising entertainers and lets them know of his services.
How’s he do it? “I look for people who are doing interesting things. And then I try to get into their networks.” Per MySpace protocol he’ll identify someone who looks interesting, then send them a message that automatically links to his MySpace profile. Recipients who are interested follow the link back to his profile.
Does it work? In six months, his MySpace page received 5,500 hits and produced work from several hip-hop musicians in New York and Chicago. It’s also making him Try that without MySpace.
Albany criminal defense lawyer Warren Redlich has not had the same luck. But he acknowledges people are not looking for lawyers per se on MySpace. Reidlach uses MySpace for social-networking, just like lawyers use social networking off line as a means to get known by others.
Nashville IP lawyer Richard D. Rose agrees. It’s like ‘a guy at a party who’s going around trying to sell everybody his widgets. MySpace is all about networking.”

Ethical implications? Solicitation? I agree with Florida Entertainment lawyer Thomas Andrew Player that it’s okay so long as you use MySpace as ‘a pull and not a push.’

Networking offline is done with a handshake and intro as to who you are and what you do. At MySpace introductions are done with a virtual handshake, a message posted to people you’d like to meet.

Lawyers and marketing consultants dismissing MySpace as good place for networking and marketing are misguided. They’ve probably never looked at MySpace for marketing. Heck, they’ve probably never spent anytime on MySpace.

MySpace may be easy to dismiss for professionals with lucrative practices advising older clients. But for younger lawyers (half of MySpace users over 35) MySpace is a perfect place to network. That’s where your target audience is gathering. Plus your competition hasn’t found the party.

Ask any of the professionals dismissing the marketing potential of MySpace how they grew their practice. They did it via networking. Just happened that online communities didn’t rule at the time.

Like a lawyer explained to me on the phone just now, “Just skip the cocktail parties.”

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