For law firms and other professional services firms concerned about security issues with WordPress, check out the post WordPress co-founder, Matt Mullenweg (@photomatt) shared last week about banks using WordPress for their websites.

…[T]here’s probably not a ton of benefit to having the online banking / billpay / etc portion of a bank’s

Matt Mullenweg (@photomatt), co-founder of WordPress, used to say WordPress is democratizing publishing. Mullenweg now describes WordPress as democratizing publishing and development.

Rather than WordPress serving as just a powerful content management system, WordPress is becoming an application development framework. WordPress will serve as a platform enabling developers to build whatever they need

Don’t tell my lawyers how to develop a strategy for blogging or how to blog, can’t you take one of our pdf newsletters and get it on blog software? Right now there are 600 loyal subscribers to the newsletter published by a renowned niche focused lawyer. This from a CMO with a large law firm

Anyone running a large scale blog publishing platform with thousands of authors will tell you that it is no trivial matter.

Especially so when the authors include lawyers from leading law firms, large and small, from around the world. Stability, security, and performance are a must.

For the last three or four months, LexBlog’s product

Pundits have made it sound easy to set up and operate WordPress blogs. So much so that law firm technology professionals are now assuming known and unknown risks by running multiple blogs with tens or hundreds of lawyer authors being read by a sophisticated audience.

But operating WordPress sites does have risks. Jeffrey Roman (