Aaron Brazell’s got a nice post this morning on Effective Presence Marketing in Social Media. Reminds me of Darren Rowse’s post on placing your blog at a ‘busy intersection.

From Aaron:

Presence Marketing is the recognition and exposure that a person or company gets simply by being there. Where is there? It is simply anywhere that people are.

In traditional advertising, it might be product placement in your favorite television show. An example of this is how Agent McGee uses the iPhone throughout NCIS. (It is unclear if this is actual Apple marketing or not – but any publicity is good publicity, in this case). Another example was the use of Cisco VoIP phones or Dell computers at CTU in 24.

In the online sense, it is nearly identical, but manifested differently. By being active on blogs, social networks or any other format that places a high dividend on visibility, companys and brands are engaging in Presence Marketing.

Lawyers do online presence marketing through effective blogging and the making use of social media.

Francis Pileggihas made himself a brand name in the area of Delaware corporate litigation through his blog. Not only is Pileggi seen on his own blog, but his blog is routinely cited by well known practicing lawyers and law professors who write on corporate law issues. Now through syndication and social media, Francis’ content is displayed at the Wall Street Journal, in the news at LinkedIn, at Harvard Business School publications, and in Bloomberg news feeds.

Think in-house counsel and exec’s selecting local counsel feel more comfortable calling Pileggi when they see him all over the place online?

And you don’t need to be a major corporation to do presence marketing. Aarron gives you one example, that being the use of Twitter.

As an individual, you have more ability to be seen and engaged as any major brand anywhere in the world. In fact, due to Twitter, it is demonstrated repeatedly that simply being present and active on Twitter can create more brand recognition and marketing capital for individuals than companies engaging in the same space and not being ‘as present’……In another day, or another age, this would not be possible because traditional marketing skews toward those who have money, time or historical depth.

I agree wholeheartedly with Aaron that little or no effort is required to be present and ‘seen’. ‘It is the lowest of the low hanging fruit in the marketing industry.’